Why I’m Actually Thankful for Donald Trump How Donald Trump's Hateful Rhetoric and Continued Popularity Exposes Issues in the Heart of American Culture

I’m quite certain that no name has been mentioned more frequently around American dinner tables in the last six months than that of Donald Trump. In fact, according to Google, searches for Donald Trump went up almost ten times in volume, to around 6.3 million, beginning in June of this year. The reason? Donald Trump has thrown his hat in the ring for the Republican nomination to be the next President of the United States, and it goes without saying that he’s been something of an…interesting candidate.

From Muslims to women to veterans to reporters to immigrants, Donald Trump has insulted and demeaned more people thus far in his presidential campaign than any other candidate in history. He has suggested that Mexican immigrants are rapists, that Muslims ought to be uniformly banned from entering the U.S., that mosques ought to be put under surveillance, and that our country ought to establish a database of the Muslims in this country.

While many people (myself included) lament Trump’s rhetoric as hate speech that has no place in 21st Century America, many more actually support Trump’s policies. In fact, 55% of Americans support the ban on Muslims entering the United States, and Trump has continued to garner an increasing amount of support from the Republican party, climbing from 18% back in July to around 34% today, with some polls reporting that Trump enjoys favorability as high as 39%.

Continue reading Why I’m Actually Thankful for Donald Trump How Donald Trump’s Hateful Rhetoric and Continued Popularity Exposes Issues in the Heart of American Culture

Where’s Your Hope? Why Conservative Christians Fear the Syrian Refugees

Last week, a host of Republican governors openly declared that their states would not welcome Syrian refugees fleeing the terror of ISIS and their war-torn country. I was deeply troubled by their remarks, because before the Constitution was even ratified, it was already clear that the control of immigration would rest squarely with the federal government. (See Arizona v. United States, 132 S.Ct. 2492 (2012), for a history.) But even more troubling for me has been the response from the community of people who claim the name of Jesus.

This is just one more heartbreaking episode of a recurring drama in American political life. Those who claim to know Jesus—the God-man who summed the entirety of the Old Testament law in two commands: Love God and Love Others—are the very same people who more often than not assume a political posture that is cold if not outright hateful.

In one conversation I had with another Christian on the subject, I was belittled for thinking that the Bible says we are to care for the marginalized and the oppressed, even at great cost to ourselves. Beyond that, my knowledge of the law was questioned because it did not comport with his view that Obama wishes to be king and the States are doing a brave and noble thing by saying no to those in need. Continue reading Where’s Your Hope? Why Conservative Christians Fear the Syrian Refugees