The Trumpy Blues, and How to Cure Them

I awoke this morning to a palpable depression in the energy around me. I didn’t need to interact with anyone to feel it. So many around me were sad, grieving the loss of someone…or something. Things weren’t any better when I went to class this afternoon. Our professor was so depressed he couldn’t teach, and so our class spent twenty-five minutes talking about the election.

As I sat observing and meditating on what I was seeing, I realized that people were literally feeling as though someone had died. Even my family snapped at me when I reminded them that I saw Trump’s victory coming back in August. (Please know that I didn’t care who won, but I know human nature enough to know well in advance who would. More on that another time.)

I continued to reflect on what I was observing and feeling in the energy of those around me as I moved from Administrative Law to Evidence, and only then did I realize that people had lost someone—or, more properly, something.

If you’ve ever read the Old Testament, you see this pattern in ancient Israel: falling into the worship of idols, repenting, and returning to a relationship with Yahweh. We look back on these ancient humans and wonder to ourselves how they could’ve been so ignorant or naïve, bowing down before manmade chunks of wood.

But we don’t have a leg up on the ancients. We do the same thing. Sure, our idols aren’t made of wood, but we still put our hope in things and people other than God, and that’s exactly what an idol is: someone or something, other than God, in which we’ve placed our hope.

For the last year-and-a-half, I’ve watched men and women, young and old, black and white, rich and poor, Republican and Democrat, Christian and non-Christian, put their hope in America instead of in the King who sits on the Eternal Throne.

Last night, as the votes were tallied and the election results poured in, the false god in which so many people had put their hope breathed its last. The heart-rate monitor flatlined. Their idol died. The idealistic utopia that people believed America to have been was exposed as a fraud. She never existed. America is and always has been a sexist, racist, and bigoted nation. Nothing about the last hundred and twenty years changed that, and last night, people saw America for what she really is.

If you are one of the people who put your hope in America, please hear me when I say that I’m sorry for your loss. Truly. I’ve put my hope in many false gods over the years, including America, and I know how much it hurts to lose them. I know the feeling of loss and the hopelessness that comes with that.

My hope and my prayer is that this election will serve as a wake-up call to feminists and advocates for equality. Your methods are not working. You cannot continue shaming your opponents; you must learn to love them. While our instincts are to hate and shame the rapists and the white supremacists, we must take our cue from the One who told us to love our enemies and to pray for those who oppress us. We must remember that he did not save this world by fighting for legislation or condemning those plagued by evil, but by laying down his very life—an act that would eventually topple an empire and lay siege to evil itself.

My hope and my prayer is that this election will serve as a wake-up call to a Church who has whored herself to a nation and rulers other than her One True King and Bridegroom. It is well past time we left the pig sty and returned home. We have abandoned the work of the Kingdom of God and sworn allegiance to a republic that is a far cry from His Name, forgetting the warning that we cannot serve two masters. We must stop looking to political candidates and parties to solve our world’s problems and start loving our neighbor—even if he or she is gay, black, Muslim, or an undocumented immigrant. Vesting our hope in this false god of America distracts us from Kingdom work, and it’s well past time we pulverized the golden calf.

Why I’m Actually Thankful for Donald Trump How Donald Trump's Hateful Rhetoric and Continued Popularity Exposes Issues in the Heart of American Culture

I’m quite certain that no name has been mentioned more frequently around American dinner tables in the last six months than that of Donald Trump. In fact, according to Google, searches for Donald Trump went up almost ten times in volume, to around 6.3 million, beginning in June of this year. The reason? Donald Trump has thrown his hat in the ring for the Republican nomination to be the next President of the United States, and it goes without saying that he’s been something of an…interesting candidate.

From Muslims to women to veterans to reporters to immigrants, Donald Trump has insulted and demeaned more people thus far in his presidential campaign than any other candidate in history. He has suggested that Mexican immigrants are rapists, that Muslims ought to be uniformly banned from entering the U.S., that mosques ought to be put under surveillance, and that our country ought to establish a database of the Muslims in this country.

While many people (myself included) lament Trump’s rhetoric as hate speech that has no place in 21st Century America, many more actually support Trump’s policies. In fact, 55% of Americans support the ban on Muslims entering the United States, and Trump has continued to garner an increasing amount of support from the Republican party, climbing from 18% back in July to around 34% today, with some polls reporting that Trump enjoys favorability as high as 39%.

Continue reading Why I’m Actually Thankful for Donald Trump How Donald Trump’s Hateful Rhetoric and Continued Popularity Exposes Issues in the Heart of American Culture